[Event] Biotechin.asia Talk Series: Confluence Point – Changing the Course of Diabetes together

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Recently, the Ministry of Health of the government of Singapore declared a war on the second leading cause of morbidity and mortality in Singapore, Diabetes. As populations across the globe age at rapid rates, prevention, cure and management of diabetes are an immediate priority.

Biotechin.asia aims to bring together multiple stakeholders in our talk series titled Confluence Point – Diabetes, organized in partnership with NUS Enterprise. Arising from the Latin word fluere or to flow, Confluence signifies the meeting of numerous streams of thought to create a powerful force.

We begin the talk series with Dr. Sue-Anne Toh, Senior Consultant Endocrinologist at NUHS and Director of the National University Health System (NUHS) Regional Health System (RHS) Planning and Development; Director of the Singapore Population HEalth impRovement Centre (SPHERiC), Assistant Professor at the NUS Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, and Adjunct Assistant Professor at the Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania (UPenn), USA who will be speaking on “Changing the Course of Diabetes: From Molecules, to Man, to the Population.”

This will be the first in a series of talks aimed at creating a broad dialogue on the various aspects of diabetes.

Date of the event: Thursday, 21st September, 2017 at 5:45 PM

Registration: Click here: www.bit.ly/cpdiabetes  

or Scan QR code in the poster

 

Who should attend the event?

Academicians, Nutritionists, Pharma companies, Clinicians, Endocrinologists, Data scientists, SME’s, Startups in the diagnostics and diabetes management space, graduate students

Why should you attend it?

  • Learn about active research happening in diabetes in Singapore.
  • Understanding the objectives and data from BRITE – SPOT and APT-2D studies
  • Understanding the challenges and the Opportunities for innovation
  • To network with partners working on a similar cause, initiate a dialogue.

Abstract of the Talk: Changing the Course of Diabetes: From Molecules, to Man, to the Population

Dr. Sue-Anne Toh, Senior Consultant Endocrinologist at NUHS and Director of the National University Health System (NUHS) Regional Health System (RHS) Planning and Development

Diabetes is a chronic, progressive, largely preventable disease responsible for millions of deaths and disability annually. Worldwide, >380 million people have diabetes. In Singapore, type 2 diabetes (T2D), the most common form of the condition, affects 1 in 9 people. The onset of diabetes and risk for suffering from complications are influenced by factors in five domains – genetics, environmental exposures, health care system, social circumstances, and behavioral patterns. The contribution of each factor, and why some progress to T2D and its associated complications (including stroke, heart, kidney, eye, blood vessel and fatty liver disease) more than others, are incompletely understood. The Bio-bank and Registry for StratIfication and Targeted intErventions in the Spectrum Of Type 2 Diabetes (BRITE-SPOT)

The onset of diabetes and risk for suffering from complications are influenced by factors in five domains – genetics, environmental exposures, health care system, social circumstances, and behavioral patterns. The contribution of each factor, and why some progress to T2D and its associated complications (including stroke, heart, kidney, eye, blood vessel and fatty liver disease) more than others, are incompletely understood. The Bio-bank and Registry for StratIfication and Targeted intErventions in the Spectrum Of Type 2 Diabetes (BRITE-SPOT) aims to build a major resource that can support a diverse range of research intended to improve the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of T2D.

Expanded from BRITE-SPOT, Assessing the Progression to Type – 2 Diabetes (APT-2D) is a prospective cohort with a focus on non-diabetics (normoglycemic or pre-diabetic). The APT-2D study recruits 1,500 pre-diabetic (borderline high glucose levels) and 800 normoglycemic (normal glucose levels) participants and follows them for up to 3 years for conversion to T2D with in depth physiology studies to assess how well the body can secrete insulin and respond to insulin.

By leveraging on population differences in risk for cardio-metabolic disease, interrogation of human derived in vitro models and biological samples, integrative physiology studies and well-characterized clinical cohorts, the research program aims to bridge the gap between association signals, functional mechanism, and applications in practice.

The overall goal is to translate strategies from molecules to the population, towards improving outcomes for the individual and health systems.